Curriculum by Year Group

You can access each year's curriculum from the links below.

Year 1

Across the school, each year group’s curriculum is based around the international primary curriculum. This helps us develop skills that enhance our learning. Geography, History, Design Technology, Art, Music, ICT, Science and RE are all linked together. We know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities.

Maths and English follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key foundational skills. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

Children will develop their knowledge about how the brain works and materials through our topic lessons. The key outcomes will be to explore and reflect on their learning, helping them to tackle different challenges presented to them throughout the year.

English

Reading

  • Children follow a scheme called ‘Read Write Inc.’, incorporating all aspects of the English curriculum including phonics (sounds), reading, writing, grammar and spelling.
  • Children read everyday in class to their partner and teacher during a formal literacy lesson and through 1:1 reading sessions with teaching assistant.
  • Pupils decode unknown words using their phonics knowledge.

Writing

  • Children write on a daily basis about the story of the week.
  • Using their phonics knowledge, children sound out words in order to spell them accurately.
  • Children take part in shared writing with the class teacher and peers.
  • Children write about pictures from the story they have been reading that week, as well as in planned writing activities that are less structured.

Grammar and Punctuation

  • Children learn to punctuate their writing - encouraged firstly to punctuate a sentence with a capital letter and a full stop.
  • More complex punctuation is then introduced such as commas, inverted commas (speech marks) and exclamation marks – spoken and written word.

Maths

Using and Applying

  • Children learn how to apply their number skills to everyday life.
  • Children are introduced to money and learn to recognise coins, including solving money calculations.
  • Children explore mathematical concepts through a variety of practical and written tasks. They are encouraged to discuss their findings with their peers.

Number

  • Children firstly secure their number facts to 10, then apply to addition and subtraction number sentences.
  • Children learn to write a number sentence and solve it using a variety of methods to solve addition and subtraction number sentences; for example using cubes, a number line and a 100 square.

Shapes, Space and Measure

  • Children learn how to partition a number into tens and units to ensure a secure number knowledge with numbers up to 20 and beyond, then progress onto repeated addition (first introduction to multiplication) and sharing (first introduction to division).
  • Pupils learn to identify and name common 2d and 3d shapes including their properties.
  • In measure, the children understand the terms length, weight and capacity. The children explore these skills during practical activities and when capable they learn how to record their findings using the correct units.

Data Handling

  • Children learn how to collect and record data first using a tally chart.
  • Children then learn how to transfer this information into a pictogram and then interpret the information. Once this skill is secure, the children then apply this knowledge to presenting and interpreting information in a Bar Chart, Carroll Diagram and a Venn Diagram.

Science

Materials

  • Children identify objects according to the materials they are made from.
  • They classify and sort materials according to their properties.
  • Children learn to recognise and name the physical properties of materials.

Seasonal Changes

  • Children understand how light and dark occurs.
  • Children learn how light travels.
  • Children explore the rotation of the Earth and how this causes seasons and day and night.

Plants and the Environment

  • Children identify and name common flowering plants.
  • They describe and label the basic structure of a flowering plant.
  • Children understand what is required for healthy growth.
  • Each child is responsible for planting and watering a sunflower seed.

History

  • Children learn how to create a timeline.
  • Children learn about events that are important to us.
  • They identify how to use objects to find out more about an event.
  • Children learn about important events that happened in our local area.
  • Children understand how we can find out about an event by interviewing someone who was there.
  • They learn how to use different sources to learn about a national event.
  • Children learn about events of global significance by asking and answering questions.

RE

Through Christian stories, children will be able to use some religious words and phrases to recall some of the things that Christians believe about God. Recognise Christian beliefs about how people should treat others and recall why the Christian bible and stories that Jesus told are important to Christians.

Children will learn:

  • The parable of the builder.
  • The parable of the kind neighbour.

Computing

This term, children will be working on using a variety of skills to illustrate an e-book.

This unit will particularly engage children who love the illustrations in the books they read. It is a great opportunity for the children to work creatively.

This unit will enable the children to:

  • Use the web safely to find ideas for an illustration.
  • Select and use appropriate painting tools to create.
  • And change images on the computer.
  • Understand how this use of ICT differs from using paint and paper.
  • Create an illustration for a particular purpose.
  • Know how to save, retrieve and change their work.
  • Reflect on their work and act on feedback received.

Music

  • Children learn the names of classroom percussion instruments and how to group them according to how they are played.
  • They learn how to recognise long and short sounds and perform them with their voice.
  • Children learn the difference between pulse and rhythm and how to play instruments in different ways to illustrate a picture or setting.
  • Children learn to compose a sequence of sounds and perform them in time to the pulse.

Art & Design

  • Children draw on different surfaces.
  • They experiment with a variety of media; pencils, rubbers, crayons, pastels, felt tips, chalk.
  • They observe and draw shapes.
  • Children investigate textures by describing, naming, rubbing, copying.
  • They observe and draw landscapes as accurately as possible, some small discussion of proportion and where the sky is.

Design Technology

  • Design - children model a house from recycled materials.
  • Make – (cross curricular link with RE) children take part in cutting and sticking activities include making flowers, paper plate faces, collage a Hanukkah star, paper lanterns, paper dragons and moving pictures
  • Evaluate – (Cross curricular link with science) children design and make a boat that can carry 4 paperclips on water & test the suitability of materials to act as a waterproof roof for a bear’s house.
  • Children have the opportunity to design and make a toy car that moves, using wheels and axels.
  • Cooking and Nutrition – Children design a healthy plate of food using collage. They create a healthy menu on using Lesson Maker, an ICT programme.

PE

  • Children will develop their Gymnastics skills which include balancing, travelling, hopping and running.
  • Children will also learn the rules of Tag Rugby and take part in this team sport.

Year 2

Across the school, each year group’s curriculum is based on the International Primary Curriculum, which focuses on a set of core values; communication, respect, co-operation, resilience, adaptability, morality and thoughtfulness. This helps us develop a more creative, meaningful and inspirational curriculum, as we know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities, and we strive to provide them with such activities. Lessons allow for the children to develop as creative thinkers, speakers, readers and writers. Pupils are taught to: listen and respond to adults and peers, ask relevant questions and articulate and justify their own ideas and opinions, speak audibly and fluently in a wide range of settings and with an ever increasing command of Standard English.

Maths, English and Science all follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key foundational skills. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

English

Reading

  • To develop phonics until decoding is secure.
  • To read common suffixes.
  • To read and re-read phonic-appropriate books.
  • To discuss and express views about fiction, non-fiction and poetry.
  • To read common ‘exception’ words.
  • To become familiar with and retell stories.
  • To ask and answer questions and make predictions.
  • To begin to make inferences.
  • To learn and recite a selection of poems.
  • To read with expression demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the text.
  • To read with or listen to a partner and provide support where possible.

Writing

  • To use appropriate size letters and spaces.
  • To develop a positive attitude and stamina for writing.
  • To begin to plan ideas for writing.
  • To record ideas for writing.
  • To record ideas sentence by sentence.
  • To make simple additions and changes after proof reading.
  • To use adjectives in an expanded noun phrase e.g. The big blue butterfly.
  • To write extended sentences using the conjunctions and, or, so, but and because.

Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling

  • To use . ! ? and ‘
  • To use the correct tense when writing in either the past or present.
  • To use some features of Standard English.
  • To spell by segmenting into phonemes.
  • To learn to spell common ‘exception’ words.
  • To spell most common sight words.
  • To recognise a noun, an adjective, a verb and an adverb in a sentence.

Speaking and Listening

  • To articulate and justify answers.
  • To initiate and respond to comments.
  • To use spoken language to develop understanding.

Maths

Using and Applying

  • Use place value to help solve number problems. •
  • Recognise, find, name and write fractions 1/3, 1/4, 2/4 and 3/4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.
  • Write simple fractions.

Number

  • Know 2x, 5x, 10x tables.
  • Compare and order numbers.
  • Write and know numbers up to 1,000.
  • Begin to use place value.
  • Know number bonds to 10 and 20.
  • Know number bonds to 100 in the context of multiples of 10.

Shape, Space and Measure

  • Tell time to the nearest 5 minute intervals.
  • Identify and sort 2D and 3D shapes.
  • Discuss properties of shapes and compare them.
  • Read scales to the nearest whole unit.
  • Use correct terminology.

Data Handling

  • Interpret simple tables and pictograms.
  • Ask and answer comparison questions.
  • Use tables and charts to find the total amount.
  • Collect and sort data into a range of charts; for example, Venn diagrams.

Science

The Earth: Our home

  • To recognise the habitats of different animals.
  • To understand how animals adapt to different habitats
  • To understand what is needed for growth in living things.

Changing and grouping materials

  • To be able to discuss the properties and characteristics of materials.
  • To understand what materials are naturally formed and what are man-made.
  • To understand how materials are changed through movement, heating and cooling.

Plants and animals in the local environment

  • To understand the difference between plants and humans.
  • To learn why different plants and animals are found in different habitats.
  • To experiment with growing a healthy plant.

Super humans

  • To understand what is healthy and how to lead a healthy lifestyle.
  • To understand what the 5 senses are and how they are used.
  • To understand how the different parts of the body are connected by the brain.

History

  • To know about different figures from history.
  • To know about key inventions that have changed our lives today.
  • To know about key achievements of famous people from the past.

Geography

  • Develop knowledge about the world, the UK and our local area.
  • Be able to name, locate and identify key characteristics of the UK.
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences between our area and areas abroad.
  • Use basic geographical vocabulary.
  • Use atlases.
  • Understand and use simple compass directions.

RE & PSHE

  • Pupils learn about 3 religions in detail. These are Judaism, Hinduism and Islam.
  • They will learn about the origins and beliefs of these religions.
  • They will also discuss their physical well-being and health.
  • Within these units the pupils will develop their understanding of moral values.

Computing

  • Children will learn to move around a screen, beginning their understanding of algorithms. Children will learn how to test games and understand the algorithms that control the game. Children will then write and edit their own simple programme.
  • Children will review photos online, practise using a digital camera, take photos to fit a given theme and then edit their photos.
  • Children research a topic safely, using a structured approach. They share their findings with others using PowerPoint.
  • Children are challenged to solve a mystery by reading, sending and replying to emails and by listening to a witness statement.
  • Children will go on a bug hunt, recording and identifying the small animals they find. They then organise the data they have collected, recording using a graphing package and use it to answer questions.

Music

  • Exploring pitch – to imitate and respond to changes in pitch, to create melodic patterns, to relate sounds to symbols in order to record work.
  • Exploring pulse and rhythm – to identify the pulse, to know the difference between pulse and rhythm, to read, perform and compose simple rhythmic notation.
  • Exploring timbre, tempo and dynamics – carefully choose and order sounds to respond to a stimulus, compose lyrics, create sound pictures and graphic scores.
  • Sing a variety of songs linked to curricular work, develop sense of pitch and awareness of performing with others.

Art

  • Use a range of materials.
  • Use drawing, painting and sculpture.
  • Develop techniques of colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
  • Learn about a range of artists, craftsman and designers.

Design Technology

  • Design purposeful, functional and appealing products.
  • Generate, model and communicate ideas.
  • Use a range of tools and materials to complete practical tasks.
  • Evaluate existing products and own ideas.
  • Build and improve structures and mechanisms.
  • Understand the basic principles of a healthy diet and where food comes from.

PE

  • Team games will be encouraged through football and hockey.
  • Development of pupils’ personal skills will be encouraged to enhance their performance.
  • Pupils will also be focusing on multi-skills, gym and basketball.
  • They will develop their ability to work as part of a team, follow rules and play fairly as well as developing the specific skills linked to these areas.
  • Over the terms they will have opportunities to practise routines and reflect on their performances.

Year 3

Year 3 is the first year in Key Stage 2, whereby children are encouraged to become more independent in their work and behaviour. A large focus of time in Year 3 is spent encouraging pupils to develop good study skills. This includes helping them to persevere with their work by being self-sufficient using a variety of resources, and learning how to solve things unaided. Children very quickly settle and rise to the Year 3 independence challenge.

The curriculum throughout Key Stage 2 is quite similar to KS1 but the expectations are different. Maths, English, Computing and Science remain the basis of the curriculum. Pupils in Year 3 are taught in ability groups for Maths and English, which we believe is the best way to ensure pupils receive focused support required for them to make the expected progress. Assessing pupils’ understanding and ability is a vital part of monitoring progress, and we aim for pupils in Year 3 to be working at the national expected level by the end of the year, if not above.

Topic is planned in line with the IPC (International Primary Curriculum) which is a new addition to the Lynch Hill curriculum this year. As a result of using the IPC, it is hoped that our pupils develop into global citizens who have a good understanding of the world and their role within it. All the topic work links with the new Primary Curriculum which was launched nationally in September 2014 and ensures that our pupils will be taught the skills necessary to prepare them well for their secondary education. The activities have cross curricular links with History, Geography, Science, Computing, Art, Design & Technology and R.E.

Over the course of the year, children in Year 3 will learn units like ‘Active Planet’, ‘Temples, Tombs and Treasures’, ‘Digital Gamers’ to mention a few.

All children are invited to attend an after school club every term. They can take part in various activities including choir, sports and creative clubs. Learn more about our [[link:58 text: extra curricular programme here]]

Class presentation assemblies, which parents are invited to, take place every term. This is an opportunity for children to share some of what they have been learning with their parents.

English

Reading

Word Reading:

  • Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.
  • Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology), both to read aloud and to understand the meanings of new words they meet.

Comprehension:
Develop positive attitudes to reading (and understanding of what they read) by:

  • Understand what they read, in books they can read independently.
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
  • Participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.
  • Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or text books.
  • Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
  • Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy tales, myths and legends, and re-telling some of these orally.
  • Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.

Writing

Plan their writing by:

  • Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
  • Discussing and recording ideas.

Draft and write by:

  • Composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
  • Organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot.
  • In non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings].

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements.
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences.
  • Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.

Spelling

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them.
  • Spell further homophones.
  • Spell words that are often misspelt.
  • Use the first two or three letters of a word to check the spelling in a dictionary.
  • Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by a teacher that include words and punctuation taught so far.

Handwriting

  • To use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left not joined.
  • To increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting.

Grammar and Punctuation

  • Extend the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although.
  • Use the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense.
  • Choose nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition.
  • Use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.
  • Use fronted adverbials.
  • Use commas after fronted adverbials.
  • Indicate possession by using the possessive apostrophe with plural nouns.
  • Use and punctuate direct speech.

Maths

Using and Applying

  • Become increasingly fluent with whole numbers and the four operations including number facts, and concept of place value.
  • Develop efficient written and mental methods and perform calculations accurately with increasingly large whole numbers.

Number and Place Value

  • Count from 0 in multiples of 4, 8, 50 and 100; find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in a three-digit number (hundreds, tens, ones).
  • Compare and order numbers up to 1,000.
  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.
  • Read and write numbers up to 1,000 in numerals and in words.
  • Solve number problems and practical problems involving these ideas.
  • Recognise and show, using diagrams, equivalent fractions with small denominators.
  • Recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

Addition & Subtraction

Add and subtract numbers mentally, including:

i. a three-digit number and 1s
ii. a three-digit number and 10s
iii. a three-digit number and 100s

  • Add and subtract numbers with up to 3 digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.
  • Estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers.
  • Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction.

Multiplication & Division

  • Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.
  • Write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables that they know, including for two-digit numbers times one-digit numbers, using mental and progressing to formal written methods.
  • Solve problems, including missing number problems, involving multiplication and division, including positive integer scaling problems and correspondence problems in which n objects are connected to m objects.

Fractions

  • Count up and down in tenths; recognise that tenths arise from dividing an object into 10 equal parts and in dividing one-digit numbers or quantities by 10.
  • Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.
  • Recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.
  • Recognise and show, using diagrams, equivalent fractions with small denominators.
  • Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator within one whole.
  • Compare and order unit fractions, and fractions with the same denominators.
  • Solve problems that involve all of the above.

Measurement

  • Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml).
  • Measure the perimeter of simple 2-D shapes.
  • Add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts.
  • Tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals from I to XII, and 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.
  • Estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute; record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours; use vocabulary such as o'clock, am/pm, morning, afternoon, noon and midnight.
  • Know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year.
  • Compare durations of events.

Properties of Shapes

  • Draw 2-D shapes and make 3-D shapes using modelling materials; recognise 3-D shapes in different orientations and describe them.
  • Recognise angles as a property of shape or a description of a turn.
  • Identify right angles, recognise that 2 right angles make a half-turn, 3 make three quarters of a turn and 4 a complete turn; identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle.
  • Identify horizontal and vertical lines and pairs of perpendicular and parallel lines.

Statistics

  • Interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
  • Solve one-step and two-step questions using information presented in scaled bar charts and pictograms and tables.

Science

Scientific Enquiry

Pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them.
  • Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers.
  • Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.
  • Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables.
  • Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions.
  • Using results to draw simple conclusions, and making predictions for new values.
  • Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes.
  • Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Plants

  • Identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers.
  • Explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant.
  • Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants.
  • Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

Animals including humans

  • Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.
  • Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

Rocks

  • Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties.
  • Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock.
  • Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.

Light

  • Recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light.
  • Notice that light is reflected from surfaces.
  • Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes.
  • Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object.
  • Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.

Forces and Magnets

  • Compare how things move on different surfaces.
  • Notice that some forces need contact between 2 objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance.
  • Observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others.
  • Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials.
  • Describe magnets as having 2 poles.];[/
  • Predict whether 2 magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

History

  • Develop a more chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British and world history, and make connections and contrasts and spot trends over time.
  • Understand changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age – The achievements of early civilisations – The Ancient Egyptians and the comparisons between Egypt and Britain at this time in history – travel, religion, building etc.
  • The Ancient Egyptians known as the most peaceful civilisation, a comparison to the Roman Empire and the power of its armies & its impact on Britain.

Geography

  • Extend knowledge and understanding of geography beyond local area and UK to a developing understanding of the geography of Africa.
  • Locate Africa’s countries using maps.
  • Name and locate African cities and human and physical characteristics – mountains, rivers, borders and coastlines.
  • Make a comparison between local area and chosen African area.
  • Understand weather patterns for different parts of Africa and compare with UK.
  • Study land use.
  • Study settlements.

RE

  • Role play on the hierarchy of Egyptian society and slavery (RR, empathy).
  • Investigate and retell religious stories – Exodus.
  • Reflect upon good and bad leadership (pharaoh vs Moses) and political power to influence a leader (RR/citizenship - a letter to the pharaoh asking for change)
  • Reflected upon the consequences of losing a homeland for Israelites (RR link to refugees).

Link to North Africa and modern Islam

  • Spread of Islam across the world.
  • Pillars of Islam.
  • Qur’an.
  • Symmetry in Islamic art and architecture (design a tile).
  • Symbolism of Mosque and prayer mats.
  • Visit a Mosque in Slough?

Computing

  • Use sequence, selection and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Understand the internet and the opportunities it offers for communication and collaboration.
  • Select, use and combine a variety of software including internet services on a range of digital devices.
  • Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly, recognising acceptable and unacceptable behaviour.
  • Identify a range of ways to report concerns.

Music

  • Play and perform African drumming instruments in solo and ensemble contexts using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
  • Listen with attention to detail to call and response rhythms of the drum.
  • Appreciate and understand traditional African music.
  • Develop an understanding of the history behind African drumming.

Art & Design

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences of Africa.
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques to make 3D Pyramids and silhouette pictures.
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works.
  • Know about artwork from Africa and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Design Technology

  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion and annotated sketches in whilst studying African Adinkra patterns and masks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including textiles according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities to create a waterproof umbrella for a science investigation and an aesthetically pleasing mask.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • Taste and understand where African where food comes from.
  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet during science topic ‘teeth and eating'.

PE

  • Running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and combination.
  • Play competitive game, such as tennis, cricket, football and badminton and apply basic principals suitable for attacking and defending.
  • Develop flexibility, strengths, technique, control and balance through athletics and gymnastics.
  • Perform dances using a range of movement patterns.
  • Compare performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.

Languages

  • Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding to greetings in French.
  • Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words while looking at the French poem ‘Deux petits Oiseaux’.
  • Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others when discussing food items and visiting a supermarket.
  • Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures.

Year 4

We are following the International Primary Curriculum in Year 4. This involves a cross-curricular approach to all foundation subjects and sees the children studying the following topics:

Saving the world

Scavengers and Settlers

Living Together

As with all year groups, pupils have the opportunity to share their work with parents in creative end of unit presentations.

We know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities and we strive to provide them with such activities. Lessons allow for the children to develop as creative thinkers, speakers, readers and writers. Pupils are taught to: listen and respond to adults and peers, ask relevant questions and articulate and justify their own ideas and opinions, speak audibly and fluently in a wide range of settings and with an ever increasing command of Standard English.

Maths, English and Science all follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key foundational skills. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

English

Reading

  • Listen to and discuss a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
  • Read books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Become more familiar with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends and retelling some of these orally.
  • Identify themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Prepare poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Recognise some different forms of poetry.
  • Use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that pupils have read.
  • Check the text makes sense, discussing understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.
  • Ask questions to improve understanding of a text.
  • Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarise these.
  • Draw inferences relating to a variety of different aspects such as a character’s feelings, thoughts and motives for their actions, justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Predict what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.
  • Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
  • Participate in discussion about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves.
  • Take turns to contribute to discussion and listening to what others say.

Writing

Spelling

Spellings are taught through the RWI programme which develops the children’s phonic knowledge to allow them to segment words when reading and build words when spelling.

  • Spell further homophones.
  • Spell words that are often misspelt (e.g. tension, enough).
  • Use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them.
  • Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals and in words with irregular plurals.
  • Use the first 2 or 3 letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.
  • Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.

Composition

Plan writing by:

  • Discussing and recording ideas.
  • Composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.

Draft writing by:

  • Organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives - creating settings, characters and plot.
  • In non-narrative material - using simple organisational devices.

Edit and evaluate writing by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements.
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences.
  • Proofread for spelling and punctuation errors.

Grammar and Punctuation

Word

  • Grammatical difference between plural and possessives.
  • Standard English forms for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms (e.g. we were instead of we was; I did instead of I done).

Sentence

  • Noun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and preposition phrases (e.g. the teacher expanded to the strict maths teacher with curly hair).
  • Fronted adverbials (e.g. Later that day, I heard the bad news.).

Text

  • Use of paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme.
  • Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun within and across sentences to aid cohesion and avoid repetition.

Punctuation

  • Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech (e.g. a comma after the reporting clause; end punctuation with inverted commas: The conductor shouted, “Sit down!”).
  • Apostrophes to mark plural possession (e.g. the girl’s name, the girls’ names).
  • Use of commas after fronted adverbials.

Terminology for pupils

  • Determiner.
  • Pronoun, possessive pronoun.
  • Adverbial.

Maths

Using and Applying

  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.
  • Round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1,000.
  • Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above and with increasingly large positive numbers.
  • Solve addition and subtraction two-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
  • Solve problems involving increasingly harder fractions to calculate quantities, and fractions to divide quantities, including non-unit fractions where the answer is a whole number.
  • Solve simple measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals to two decimal places.
  • Solve problems involving multiplying and adding, including using the distributive law to multiply two digit numbers by one digit, integer scaling problems and harder correspondence problems such as n objects are connected to m objects.

Number

  • Count in multiples of 6, 7, 9, 25 and 1,000.
  • Find 1,000 more or less than a given number.
  • Count backwards through zero to include negative numbers.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in a four-digit number (thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones).
  • Order and compare numbers beyond 1,000.
  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.
  • Read Roman numerals to 100 (I to C) and know that over time, the numeral system changed to include the concept of zero and place value.
  • Add and subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction where appropriate.
  • Estimate and use inverse operations to check answers to a calculation.
  • Recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12.
  • Use place value, known and derived facts to multiply and divide mentally, including: multiplying by 0 and 1; dividing by 1; multiplying together three numbers.
  • Add and subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction where appropriate.
  • Estimate and use inverse operations to check answers to a calculation.
  • Solve addition and subtraction two-step problems.
  • Recognise and show, using diagrams, families of common equivalent fractions.
  • Count up and down in hundredths; recognise that hundredths arise when dividing an object by one hundred and dividing tenths by ten.
  • Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator.
  • In contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
  • Recognise and write decimal equivalents of any number of tenths or hundredths.
  • Recognise and write decimal equivalents to ¼, ½, ¾
  • Find the effect of dividing a one- or two-digit number by 10 and 100, identifying the value of the digits in the answer as ones, tenths and hundredths.
  • Round decimals with one decimal place to the nearest whole number.
  • Compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to two decimal places.
  • Recognise and use factor pairs and commutativity in mental calculations.
  • Multiply two-digit and three-digit numbers by a one-digit number using formal written layout.

Shape, Space and Measure

  • Compare and classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes.
  • Identify acute and obtuse angles and compare and order angles up to two right angles by size.
  • Convert between different units of measure (for example, kilometre to metre; hour to minute).
  • Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres.
  • Find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting squares.
  • Estimate, compare and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence.
  • Read, write and convert time between analogue and digital 12- and 24-hour clocks.
  • Solve problems converting from hours to minutes; minutes to seconds; years to months; weeks to days.
  • Identify lines of symmetry in 2-D shapes presented in different orientations.
  • Complete a simple symmetric figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry.
  • Describe positions on a 2-D grid as coordinates in the first quadrant.
  • Describe movements between positions as translations of a given unit to the left/right and up/down.
  • Plot specified points and draw sides to complete a given polygon.

Data Handling

  • Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.
  • Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and other graphs.

Science

Living things and their habitat

  • Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.
  • Explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment.
  • Recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.
  • Children will begin to understand the concept of a habitat, how it provides organisms found there with conditions for life and how animals depend on plants or other animals that eat plants for food.

Sound

  • Identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating.
  • Recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear.
  • Find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it.
  • Find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it.
  • Recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

Electricity

  • Identify common appliances that run on electricity.
  • Construct simple series circuits to make devices work.
  • Be able to change the number of components in a circuit to have a different effect.
  • Know which materials conduct electricity.
  • Know that some materials conduct heat more effectively than others.
  • Know about the principals of magnets and magnetic and non-magnetic materials.
  • Know about the dangers of electricity.

Animals, including humans

  • Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans.
  • Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their function.
  • Construct and interpret food chains and food webs.
  • Know about the human skeleton.

Investigation:
Throughout the year, the children will have the opportunity to plan and carry out scientific investigations. They will:

  • Suggest ways of collecting evidence.
  • Know how to make the investigation a fair test by changing only one factor.
  • Predict the outcomes of the investigation.
  • Use simple scientific enquiry.
  • Test their ideas.
  • Record and communicate their observations and findings in a variety of ways.
  • Use the evidence to draw conclusions and explain their findings.

History

Scavengers and Settlers

  • Know about the main characteristics of people and cultures that existed during the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age.
  • Know about the lives of people and the main similarities and differences between societies that existed in the above periods.
  • Understand that we can learn about the past using different sources.

Living Together

  • Learn about the history of our school and its community.
  • Learn about someone who has been significant to the local community.
  • Learn a historical event that has had an impact on a community.

Geography

General skills

  • Be able to use geographical terms.
  • Be able to use maps at a variety of scales to locate the position and geographical features of particular localities.
  • Be able to use secondary sources to obtain geographical information.
  • Be able to express views on the features of an environment and the way it is being harmed or improved.
  • Be able to communicate geographical knowledge and understanding to ask and answer questions about geographical and environmental features.

Saving The World

  • Know how rainforests have been affected by human activities.
  • Know how the nature of rainforests affects the lives of people.
  • Understand how rainforests fit into a wider geographical context.
  • Understand that the quality of a rainforest environment can be sustained and improved.

Living Together

  • How our school meets the needs of the community.
  • Learn about the buildings and services in our local area.
  • Learn about communities in a different country.
  • Learn how to identify the places and area of interest in our local area.

RE

Caribbean

  • Story of King Solomon.
  • Rastafarian beliefs, music and poetry.
  • Moral and ethical basis of behaviour.

Creation linking to the Rainforest

  • Hebrew Bible creation narrative.
  • Stewardship and the moral and ethical basis for care for the world.
  • Comparison to other faith groups.

Computing

Ongoing ICT skills
Basic computer skills – logging on, saving, printing etc

  • Keyboard skills.
  • Internet safety.
  • Developing Digital Arts skills – using digital cameras & recorders.
  • Cross-curricular ICT – VLE use, regular access to online computer packages.

Computing
In addition to the ICT that is used across the curriculum, the children will also be studying ‘Computing’. This will involve the following units of work:

  • Children using software development using Scratch to create and debug a mathematical game.
  • Students becoming ‘Toy designers’ and using Scratch to model a new interactive toy design.
  • Children becoming Music Editors with the children editing audio tracks in Audacity.
  • Children becoming HTML editors using HTML to create a web page.
  • Children producing a Wiki page (presenting information for others as online digital content).
  • Children becoming meteorologists where they will be collecting and presenting data.

Music

  • Learn to play notes C to G on the trumpet and achieve a clear and accurate sound. 
  • Read, perform and compose rhythmic notation.
  • Play individually and in groups following musical instruction.
  • Learn Kodaly methodology and use it to sight sing simple melodies.
  • Sing songs with a good sense of pitch in unison and in parts.

Art

  • Observational drawing of rainforest leaves using pencil sketches and then adding colour.
  • Paint mixing skills developed in order to create shade and tone when creating a rainforest landscape.
  • Know how a number of artists and craftsmen – from the Stone Age to the Iron Age- used forms, materials and processes to suit their purpose.
  • Create a cave painting.
  • Create a piece of Stone Age pottery.
  • Represent ideas about community through art.

PE

Pupils will consolidate existing skills and gain new ones in athletics, football, gymnastics, dance, rugby, tennis and cricket recognising the positive impact of physical exercise on health.

  • In football, children will be able to dribble and pass with the inside and outside of the foot; control a ball while moving; demonstrate correct stance; and use communication when giving or receiving the ball.
  • In gymnastics and dance pupils will memorise routines; perform a selection of moves in the correct order; and, using a strong stance, control moves and improve timing. They will also identify the different body parts used, and be able to perform to an audience.
  • In rugby, pupils will develop their understanding of the rules of tag rugby and their ability to handle a rugby ball using two hands; hold the ball in the correct position; pick up the ball correctly and place the ball on the try line; pass the ball backwards; use the correct communication; and be able to find the correct space to support teammates.
  • In tennis, children will be able to play a forehand and backhand after drop feeding to themselves; understand the different positions and stances, including recovering to the centre after a shot is played; under arm serve; and be able to side step across the court.

In the summer, pupils will receive coaching in cricket and athletics.

  • In cricket, children will refine their skills and develop a greater understanding of arm positioning when rolling and throwing; stop a bouncing ball; catch a cricket ball using two hands and one hand from a low height; and begin to play more attacking shots when batting and understand the need for defensive shots.
  • In athletics, there are opportunities for children to experience a wide range of track and field events - learning the key techniques needed in order to run faster or jump/throw further and for them to challenge themselves to beat their personal bests. They will be able to jump a hurdle, handle a baton with one hand, pass on the baton into a teammate’s hands and understand the need to conserve energy when running.

Languages

  • Parts of the body (Jean petit).
  • Animals and Adjectives and conjugating the verb “Etre”.
  • Members of the family.
  • Pets and conjugating the verb “Avoir”.
  • Hobbies and opinion phrases.
  • Enrichment activities will be centred around holidays and numbers 12-31.

Year 5

In line with National guidelines, Maths and English follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key basic skills. These lessons are delivered daily and the children are in ability groups in order to target their needs more closely. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

Each year group’s curriculum is based around the IPC; this helps us develop a more creative, meaningful and inspirational curriculum. Each of the units we cover across the year will cover subject and skills linked to Geography, History, Design Technology, Art, and Science.

In addition, the children are also very lucky to be taught by specialist teachers in their PE, Music and Art lessons as well as French and Computing lessons taught by their class teacher. Their learning is further enriched through our PSHE, Rights Respecting and RE focused lessons. The children really enjoy exploring other cultures as well as health, relationships and British Values.

We know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities and we strive to provide them with such activities. Lessons allow for the children to develop as creative thinkers, speakers, readers and writers. Pupils are taught to: listen and respond to adults and peers, ask relevant questions and articulate and justify their own ideas and opinions, speak audibly and fluently in a wide range of settings and with an ever increasing command of Standard English.

English

Reading

  • Read a wide text type including fiction, non fiction, poetry, plays and prose.
  • Read books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Read a wider range of genre including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Recommend books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.
  • Make comparisons within and across books.
  • Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform by heart, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience.
  • Check understanding and explore the meaning of words in context using questioning.
  • Summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Make predictions about what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.
  • Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.
  • Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.
  • Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
  • Participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously.
  • Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary.
  • Provide reasoned justifications for their views.

Writing

Spelling

  • Use further prefixes and suffixes.
  • Spell some words with ‘silent’ letters [for example knight, psalm, solemn].
  • Continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused.
  • Explore word origins and how words are formed. To recognise words which do not follow spelling patterns and learn these.
  • Use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words, e.g. use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary.
  • Use a thesaurus.

Composition

Plan writing by:

  • Write in a range of genres considering the audience, purpose and form.
  • Use previous reading and research to develop initial ideas and record these using notes.
  • Develop characters and settings using techniques modelled by authors.

Draft and write by:

  • Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.
  • In narratives, show character and action through description and dialogue.
  • Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs.
  • Use a variety of layout features to structure and organise texts e.g. subheadings.

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.
  • Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning.
  • Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement.
  • Proof read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Grammar and Punctuation

Word

  • Converting nouns or adjectives into verbs using suffixes [for example, –ate; –ise; –ifyVerb prefixes [for example, dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–]

Sentence

  • Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun 
  • Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

Text

  • Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
  • Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]

Punctuation

  • Using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis.
  • Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity.

Terminology for pupils

  • Modal verb, relative pronoun
  • Relative clause
  • Parenthesis, bracket, dash
  • Cohesion, ambiguity

Maths

Number

Place Value

  • Read, write, order, compare and round numbers to 1,000,000 and solve problems.
  • Understand and use negative numbers in context.
  • Read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals.
  • Multiply and divide whole numbers and those involving decimals by 10, 100 and 1,000.

Calculations

  • Add and subtract whole numbers using mental strategies and written methods.
  • Check answers to calculations.
  • Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a one- or two-digit number using a formal written method, including long multiplication for two-digit numbers.
  • Multiply and divide numbers mentally drawing upon known facts.
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a one-digit number using the formal written method of short division.
  • Solve multi-step problems in different contexts and across all four operations.

Properties of Numbers

  • Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number, and common factors of two numbers.
  • Know and use the vocabulary of prime numbers, prime factors and composite (non-prime) numbers.

Fractions

  • Compare and order fractions.
  • Identify, name and write equivalent fractions.
  • Recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to the other.
  • Add and subtract fractions.
  • Multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers.
  • Recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to ‘number of parts per hundred’.
  • Write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal.
  • Solve problems that require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents.

Shape, Space and Measure

Measure

  • Convert between different units of metric measure.
  • Solve problems involving converting between units of time including timetables.
  • Understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints.

Space

  • Calculate and compare the area of rectangles.
  • Estimate the area of irregular shapes.
  • Measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in centimetres and metres.
  • Estimate volume and capacity.

Shape

  • Know angles are measured in degrees: estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles.
  • Draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (°).
  • Know different angle rules.
  • Distinguish between regular and irregular polygons based on reasoning about equal sides and angles.
  • Use the properties of rectangles to deduce related facts and find missing lengths and angles.
  • Identify, describe and represent the position of a shape following a reflection or translation.
  • Identify 3-D shapes, including cubes and other cuboids, from 2-D representations.

Data Handling

  • Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.
  • Complete, read and interpret information in tables.

Science

IPC Brainwave learning targets

  • About different methods of teaching and how we like to learn.
  • About some different areas of the brain.
  • How information gets into the brain.
  • How relaxation can help prepare us for learning.
  • How we can improve our memory.
  • How positive thinking can help us to succeed.
  • How we can support each other to achieve our goals.
  • How we can become more active global citizen.

Science Investigators

  • About several ways to investigate in science.
  • How to make sure our investigations are well designed and reliable.
  • Ways to: collect, record, interpret and present our findings.
  • About several materials and their properties.

Bake It

  • How live yeast grows.
  • How carbon dioxide behaves.
  • Which solids dissolve in water.
  • About water vapour and evaporation.
  • What happens when foods are heated.
  • About the properties of water.
  • About solids, liquids and gases.

Space Explorers

  • Making a pinhole viewer to record the size of the Sun and the Moon.
  • Comparing the size of the planets and their distance from the Sun.
  • Finding out about the movements of the Earth, Sun and Moon and how they affect us.
  • Classifying rocks and comparing rocks on Earth with those on the Moon.
  • Finding out about how craters are formed and the forces that are involved.
  • Making a spectronometer to find out about light and what it contains.
  • Finding out about how light travels.
  • Creating a timeline to show the life cycle of a star.
  • Finding out more about the planets in our solar system.
  • Finding out about what people in the past used to think about the Earth, Sun and Moon.
  • Finding out about Galileo and his findings about the Earth, Sun and Moon.
  • Finding out about the constellations and the stories that they tell.
  • Making a timeline to show some of the important events in the history of astronomy and space.

Roots, Shoots and Fruits

  • What plants grow in our local area.
  • How to sort and group plants.
  • What the parts of a plant are.
  • The function of roots.
  • What plants need in order to grow.
  • How flowers attract insects.
  • How plants reproduce.
  • How seeds are spread.

[[link:362 text:Year 5 IPC Here, Now, There and Then]]

RE

  • The right to express our cultures equally.
  • Narratives, beliefs and their impact on life in Hinduism and Buddhism.

Computing

  • Securing basic skills using Microsoft, Word, Publisher and Powerpoint including the use of digital images and film.
  • Graphical Modelling and digital manipulation – Using Inkscape, Scratch and Scratch to create tessellations and repeating patterns.
  • What is the internet and how can we use it safely? Children will create their own web space to inform others.
  • Use programming skills to create a simple game using Scratch.

Music

  • To continue learning a brass instrument from Year 4, adding more notes to the range they can already play and improving sound produced.
  • To read, perform and compose more complex rhythmic patterns.
  • To read and write pitch notation.
  • To play individually and in groups following musical instruction.
  • To use Kodaly to sing melodies at sight.
  • To sing and play in unison and in parts with an awareness of others.

Art

  • Children will complete a study of their local environment and use different media such as pencil and water colours to produce their own images.
  • In a study on different artists they will create images of themselves and their surroundings in the style of cubism and abstract art.
  • Linking with religious studies, the children will explore how symbolism is used, looking at patterns and design in Hinduism and Buddhism.

Design Technology

  • Children will build an understanding of how ingredients are used in bread, designing producing and evaluating their own adapted recipe.
  • Children will produce 3D puppets using a range of materials. These puppets will be based on those used traditionally to depict religious narratives.

PE

Pupils will consolidate existing skills and gain new ones in: athletics, football, gymnastics, dance, rugby, basketball and cricket. They will be recognising the positive impact of physical exercise on health.

  • During the football sessions, children will enhance their understanding of the game and develop their skills: dribbling, passing, tackling.
  • In gymnastics and dance pupils will create and perform their own fluent sequences on the floor and on apparatus, showing that they can vary speed, level and direction. 
  • In rugby, basketball and tennis, pupils will develop their ability to be able to work effectively with others and use skills and tactics to defend and attack.
  • In athletics, both indoors and outdoors, children will gain a better understanding of track and field events and strive to reach personal bests in Quad kids.

Languages

  • Our themes of study in year 5 are: The town; Weather and the Seasons; The planets (a cross curricular project) and Health, Exercise and Nutrition.
  • In speaking and listening: Children will recognise and produce French sound patterns; Ask for and offer opinions; Hold simple conversations with a partner; understand the meaning of spoken dialogue in the target language and begin to practice and deliver short presentations.
  • In Reading: Children will read short fiction and non-fiction texts; find the main point of a text; use a bilingual dictionary to find the translation of unfamiliar words and identify grammar rules.
  • In writing: Children will produce short pieces of writing; use and adapt modelled texts and apply their knowledge of grammatical rules.

Year 6

Our curriculum covers a broad range of subjects which allows the children to learn in a wide range of styles combining core and foundation subjects. Each day children have core Maths and English lessons, which are taught in ability sets to allow the children to follow a more personalised programme of study geared toward their individual targets, based on the new national curriculum as introduced in 2014. These lessons, along with Guided Reading and Extended Writing sessions, are intended to develop children’s basic skills which are integral to their success as a learner, and will allow them to access all areas of the curriculum.

New for this year, the children will be following the International Primary Curriculum (IPC) to cover topics in Science, Geography, History and Art. Each unit of work is based around a theme and promotes thinking skills through the 8 personal goals: adaptability, enquiry, respect, resilience, communication, co-operation, morality and thoughtfulness.

All children are also given the opportunity to explore British values and culture, in the context of school community and global citizenship.

We know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities and we strive to provide them with such activities. Lessons allow for the children to develop as creative thinkers, speakers, readers and writers. Pupils are taught to: listen and respond to adults and peers, ask relevant questions and articulate and justify their own ideas and opinions, speak audibly and fluently in a wide range of settings and with an ever increasing command of Standard English.

Maths, English and Science all follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key foundational skills. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

English

Reading (word study and comprehension)

  • Read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books and short texts.
  • Read books and texts structured in different ways, and read for a range of purposes.
  • Increase familiarity with a range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Learn a wider range of poetry by heart.
  • Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and perform.
  • Prepare and perform readings with appropriate intonation to show their understanding. Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s).
  • Develop a deep understanding of texts and be able to express opinions about them. Locate evidence to support views.
  • Make comparisons within and across books.
  • Identify and discuss themes and conventions across a wide range of writing.
  • Discuss and evaluate author’s use of language, considering impact on the reader.
  • Our pupils are encouraged to read widely and frequently and enjoy language and recommend reading material to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Ask questions to improve understanding.
  • Make predictions from details stated and implied.
  • Summarise main ideas and identify key details.
  • Work out unfamiliar words using known strategies.
  • Apply growing knowledge of root words to support understanding of new words they come across.

Writing (composition and handwriting)

  • Identify the audience and purpose of the writing when tackling pieces.
  • Plan effectively, noting and developing initial ideas and drawing on reading experiences.
  • In writing narratives, consider how authors studied have developed characters and settings.
  • Select appropriate grammar and increasingly challenging vocabulary when writing and understand how choices can enhance or even change meaning.
  • Integrate dialogue to convey character and advance action within independent texts.
  • Use a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs.
  • Use further organisational and presentational devices, including headings and bullet points.
  • Be able to write in any given genre showing a clear understanding of techniques and the success criteria.
  • Draft and write independently.
  • Be able to effectively evaluate own writing and that of others and refine and edit texts, responding to feedback.
  • Refine proof reading skills.
  • Pupils will also be taught to write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed.

Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

  • Be able to use and apply a wider range of punctuation effectively when writing and understand how the different forms can have a differing impact on a text.
  • Use commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing.
  • Use hyphens with increasing accuracy.
  • Use of brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis.
  • Use semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses.
  • Use a colon to introduce a list.
  • Be confident with prefixes and suffixes and the wide range of spelling rules and guidance to support higher level spelling including silent letters.
  • Know the homophones and other words that are often confused.
  • Follow a spelling programme of study for Y6 (and as suited to pupil‘s needs).
  • Use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and know that some words just need to be learnt specifically.
  • Develop confidence using a dictionary and thesaurus to support when writing.
  • Develop secure understanding of Y6 grammar and be able to apply this when speaking and when writing.

This is the summary of Year 6 English Curriculum. For further detail on content, please click here

Maths

Number

Place Value, ordering and rounding

  • Find the difference between a positive and a negative integer, or two negative integers.
  • Use decimal notation for tenths, hundredths and thousandths; partition, round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Calculate mentally with integers and decimals: U.t +/– U.t, TU × U, TU ÷ U, U.t × U, U.t ÷ U.

Properties of numbers and number sequences

  • Use knowledge of multiplication facts to derive quickly squares of numbers to 12 × 12 and the corresponding squares of multiples of 10.
  • Use approximations, inverse operations and tests of divisibility to estimate and check results.
  • Use knowledge of place value and multiplication facts to 10 × 10 to derive related multiplication and division facts involving decimal numbers, e.g. 0.8 × 7, 4.8 ÷ 6
  • Recognise that prime numbers have only two factors and identify prime numbers less than 100; find the prime factors of two-digit numbers.

Fractions, decimals, %, ratio and proportion

  • Solve simple problems involving direct proportion by scaling quantities up or down.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another, e.g. express £400 as a percentage of £1000; find equivalent percentages, decimals and fractions.
  • Find fractions and percentages of whole-number quantities, e.g. 5/8 of 96, 65% of £260.

Shape, Space and Measure

Place Value, ordering and rounding

  • Find the difference between a positive and a negative integer, or two negative integers.
  • Use decimal notation for tenths, hundredths and thousandths; partition, round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line
  • Calculate mentally with integers and decimals: U.t +/– U.t, TU × U, TU ÷ U, U.t × U, U.t ÷ U.

Properties of numbers and number sequences

  • Use knowledge of multiplication facts to derive quickly squares of numbers to 12 × 12 and the corresponding squares of multiples of 10.
  • Use approximations, inverse operations and tests of divisibility to estimate and check results.
  • Use knowledge of place value and multiplication facts to 10 × 10 to derive related multiplication and division facts involving decimal numbers, e.g. 0.8 × 7, 4.8 ÷ 6
  • Recognise that prime numbers have only two factors and identify prime numbers less than 100; find the prime factors of two-digit numbers.

Fractions, decimals, %, ratio and proportion

  • Solve simple problems involving direct proportion by scaling quantities up or down.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another, e.g. express £400 as a percentage of £1000; find equivalent percentages, decimals and fractions.
  • Find fractions and percentages of whole-number quantities, e.g. 5/8 of 96, 65% of £260.

Data Handling

  • Describe and predict outcomes from data using the language of chance or likelihood.
  • Draw conclusions and identify further questions to ask.
  • Solve problems by collecting, selecting, processing, presenting and interpreting data, using ICT where appropriate.
  • Construct and interpret frequency tables, bar charts with grouped discrete data, and line graphs.
  • Draw conclusions and identify further questions to ask.
  • Suggest, plan and develop lines of enquiry; collect, organise and represent information, interpret results and review methods; identify and answer related questions.
  • Interpret pie charts.
  • Construct and interpret frequency tables, bar charts with grouped discrete data, and line graphs.
  • Describe and interpret results and solutions to problems using the mode, range, median and mean.

Using and Applying

  • Solve multi-step problems, and problems involving fractions, decimals and percentages; choose and use appropriate calculation strategies at each stage.
  • Represent and interpret sequences, patterns and relationships involving numbers and shapes.
  • Suggest and test hypotheses.
  • Construct and use simple expressions and formulae in words then symbols, e.g. the cost of c pens at 15 pence each is 15c pence.
  • Explain reasoning and conclusions, using words, symbols or diagrams as appropriate.

This is the summary of Year 6 Maths Curriculum - for further detail on content, please click here

Science

Forces and Magnets

  • Investigate a variety of forces including magnetism, gravity and friction.
  • Understand that forces have direction and can be measured. This will make it easier for children to apply their knowledge to predict changes in motion which occur when forces act on an object.

Living things and their habitats

  • Know how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences including microorganisms, plants and animals.
  • Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Animals, including humans

  • Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood.
  • Recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and life style on the way their bodies function.
  • Describe the way in which nutrients and water are transported within animals including humans.

Evolution and inheritance

  • Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.
  • Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind but normally offspring vary and are not identical to the parents.
  • Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

Light

  • Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines.
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye.
  • Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes.
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

Electricity

  • Associate the brightness of a lamp where the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit.
  • Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function including brightness of bulb, the loudness of buzzers, on/off position of switches.
  • Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit diagram.

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British and world history.
  • Ancient Greece – a study of life and achievements and their influence on the world.
  • The legacy of Greek culture (art, architecture, literature, food) on later periods of British history including present day.
  • Case study on life during WW2 and the impact of the Holocaust, through written activities and links with the literacy curriculum.
  • Research important discoveries and inventions from the past and their relevance today.
  • Find out about famous innovators whose ideas brought about social change.
  • Discover how our local area has changed and evolved over time.

Geography

  • Extend knowledge and understanding beyond local area and UK to include Europe and the wider world.
  • Locate continents, countries, cities, oceans, coasts, rivers and mountain ranges on a world map.
  • Each class to carry out in depth geographical study of countries including their landmarks, the effects of tourism on economy and the environment.
  • Understand how to be good global citizens.
  • Human geography – trade links throughout the world, economic activities, types of settlement and land use.
  • Physical geography – understand the different climate zones, vegetation and biodiversity of different countries.
  • Use 8 points of compass and six figure grid references (longitude/latitude).

RE & PSHE

  • What is religion?
  • Similarities between different religions.
  • Make informed responses to questions about religion and culture.
  • On a weekly basis pupils will participate fully in ‘Thought for the Week’, discussing quotes and developing their understanding of social, moral, spiritual and cultural issues and encouraging their understanding of British values.
  • They will deepen their understanding of responsibility and keeping safe.
  • They will recognise, predict and assess risk in different situations.
  • They will learn strategies for coping with peer pressure and media influences.
  • The pupils will explore issues including the challenging of stereotypes, diversity and accepting differences.

Computing

Digital Literacy

  • What is the internet? How does the internet work?
  • Making effective searches using internet sites that link to the Topic of study.
  • Cross-curricular projects.
  • Video making - Using Movie-Maker.
  • Designing Travel Guide – Using Publisher.

Computer Science

  • Developing an invention quiz using Power Point.
  • Control - Using Flowol Mimics.
  • Monitoring – using heart monitors & sensors linking to Science.
  • Programming Games – using Scratch.

Information Technology

  • What is Spreadsheet modelling? (Using Ms Excel)
  • Programming software - Scratch to create calculator game.
  • Links to Maths/Science.

Music

  • Pupils will take part in musical activities throughout the year performing in the choir and in school productions.
  • Pupils are given the opportunity to further their musical skills in brass band practice and in cross-curricular projects.

Art & Design

  • To continue to build their Art portfolio to record, review, improve and revisit.
  • To explore a range of art and design techniques including, measurement (2D & 3D designs of European landmarks), sketching using simple & complex shapes, water colour and mixing paint to create tones and shades to create a Blitz scene.
  • To learn about influential European artists including Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso and produce their own interpretation in style of these artists.

Design Technology

  • Understand and use mechanical systems such as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages in order to make a working model of a design/landmark.
  • To research and develop a design which would be appropriate for the area/environment chosen.
  • Children will create a working prototype.
  • Select the right materials, tools and equipment to complete their landmark design.
  • Wider market evaluation and self-evaluate.

PE

Pupils will consolidate existing skills and gain new ones in athletics, football, gymnastics, dance, rugby, tennis and cricket, recognising the positive impact of physical exercise on health.

  • In football, children will refine their techniques for dribbling, passing, tackling and shooting and learn the match play rules to enable matches to run. Children will hopefully be able to pass and shoot the ball using a half volley, understand the different positions used in football, pass the ball using both feet from different heights, distances and power, understand the importance of keeping possession, use greater control and skill, demonstrate positive teamwork skills, develop a better understanding of different tactics, and show composure when playing under pressure.
  • In gymnastics and dance pupils will create and perform their own fluent sequences on the floor and on apparatus, showing that they can vary speed, level and direction, inspire and enthuse others and be creative and original. They will show they can have a controlled run up and safe landing.
  • In rugby, pupils will understand the importance of a warm up, be able to receive and pass the ball with good control, understand offside rule and be able to respect and enforce rules within a game, show ability to move in line whilst defending, understand and use the 3 s’s effectively.
  • In cricket, children will refine their skills and develop a greater understanding of the rules of this sport, showing that they can play shots off their front and back feet, demonstrating a good understanding of fielding positions, use short barrier technique for running in and picking up the cricket ball, bowling over arm with growing accuracy, hitting and catching the ball at different heights and positions.
  • In athletics, there are opportunities for children to experience a wide range of track and field events - learning the key techniques needed in order to run faster or jump/throw further and for them to challenge themselves to beat their personal bests.

Languages

  • Children will continue to develop their basic understanding of the French language and how to convey opinions when asked simple questions. They will also be able to discuss countries and travel.
  • In a further link to their Topic work they will specifically be looking at useful holiday phrases relating to travel and transport. Children will also develop their writing skills in French using new vocabulary acquired.